Lodge Rothes No 532

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What is Freemasonary?

Freemasonry is
An ancient brotherhood dedicated to friendship, morality, and brotherly love where moral lessons are veiled in allegory and illustrated by signs and symbols. Masonic secrets are simply methods used by freemasons to recognise each other. Freemasonry interferes with neither religion or politics. Freemasonry only strives to teach a man the duty he owes to his God, to his neighbour and to himself.
Freemasonry is NOT
A Religion - although to become a Mason, a man must believe in a supreme being.
A Charity - even though Masons contribute considerably to worthwhile charities.
A Subversive Organization - a Mason must be a peaceful, law abiding citizen.
A Political Party or Action Group – Masons are free to follow their own political persuasion.
A Secret Society – If it was, Nobody but Masons would know about it.
Freemasonry’s Principles are steady standards of life and conduct in a changing world.
Scotland has the oldest Lodges in the world and has many Lodges at home and abroad. In Scotland Lodges are arranged into Provinces, abroad they are arranged into Districts. The Grand Lodge of Scotland is one of the oldest in the world and works in harmony with all other “Regular” Grand Lodges i.e. those whose members profess a belief in a Supreme Being and follow the same basic principles and practices as the Scottish Freemason.
BROTHERLY LOVE is the concern which each Freemason has for his Brother, which is readily shown by tolerance and respect for the beliefs, opinions and practices of his fellows and his willingness to care for his Brother and that Brother's dependants.
RELIEF The Freemason is by nature and teaching a charitable man. He will cheerfully and kindly assist those less fortunate (whether Freemasons or not!). He will care for and support his community  local, national and international.
TRUTH  The Freemason believes in Truth in all things in honesty and integrity in his personal, business and public life, in fair dealings and in firm standards of decency and morality.
OUR FRATERNITY has a wonderful history, which dates back more than three centuries. It is one of the world's oldest secular fraternities, a society of men concerned with moral and spiritual values. Founded on the three great principles of Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth, it aims to bring together men of goodwill, regardless of background and differences.
HOW TO BECOME A FREEMASON
One of Freemasonry's customs is not to solicit members. However, anyone should feel free to approach any Freemason to seek further information. Freemasonry is a multi-racial and multi-cultural organisation. It has attracted men of goodwill from all sectors of the community into membership. The doors of Freemasonry are open to men who seek harmony with their fellow man, feel the need for self-improvement and wish to participate in making this world a better place in which to live.
Membership in Freemasonry is based on three unwavering principles.
The first of these, is a belief in a Supreme Being.
You will note that we do not state a belief in God. We recognise that each man must allow his life to be guided by his own principles and we do not wish to impose a primarily Christian structure upon anyone. Freemasonry is founded on the belief in the Brotherhood of Man under the Fatherhood of God. However, that god, in the broadest sense, can take many names. We welcome men of all cultures and all faiths. What we have in common is a belief in a single, omnipotent being who above all guides our destinies.
The second is to be of the mature age of 21 years. or (In Scotland the son of a Mason may be admitted on reaching 18 years of age)
Thirdly, and of greatest importance, a man must be judged to be of good moral character. This requires that someone who is a Freemason knows you and is willing to attest to your character. If you feel that you adhere to those principles, you must first be acquainted with at least two Freemasons who are willing to sponsor your application. Ask these Freemasons and they will furnish you with a form of application and return the form to your local Lodge on your behalf. Further inquiry into your character will be made following this application and you will then be called along to be interviewed by a panel giving you the chance to satisfy yourself that you wish to become a Freemason.
From The Grand Lodge of Scotland